Home Forums Melanoma Diagnosis: Stage IV Genetically engineering a patient’s immune system

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  • #20660
    Arno
    Participant

    Has anyone heard about the below new Phase I trial? The title of the article is “Engineering the Immune System to Fight Melanoma”. Very interesting new method to activate the immune system.

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/engineering-the-immune-system-to-fight-melanoma” class=”bbcode_url”>http://www.newswise.com/articles/engineering-the-immune-system-to-fight-melanoma

    Arno

    #56797
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Thanks for the link Arno. Sounds like a variation of TIL.

    Jeff

    #56798
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    That’s what I think it is, much like the TIL therapy that is offered at NIH and other places.

    #56799
    cltml
    Participant

    How is this not the same as the TIL treatment being done at the NIH already? Sounds like the same process?

    I see that the NIH is funding. If this is their way of getting the TIL treatment “downmarket” to patients who are too poor a risk for Rosenberg’s program, then that’s good. Let’s see how the process and drugs work on poorer risks.

    cltml

    #56800
    PhillyRed
    Participant

    Regarding the actual treatment procedure of the experimental therapy, yes, the described trial is offering a form of TIL treatment. I think how this study differs from conventional TIL therapy (which removes tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes (TILs) from the tumor, activates them and grows them in the lab, and then introduces them back into the patient), is the genetic engineering component of this clinical study. After removing the lymphocytes, the investigators will genetically manipulate the cells in the lab and actually insert 2 genes into the lymphocytes; these genes (which were not identified in the linked article) presumably allow the T cells to better recognize the tumor cells and/or enhance their ability to kill the tumor cells. So, following the genetic engineering to insert the genes, the T cells would then be activated and grown in the lab, and reintroduced into the patient, as per the conventional TIL therapy.

    #56801
    Anonymous
    Guest

    That was my impression as well. Hope it works too as the NIH’s TIL results (complete and partial responses) seems to be very good indeed even though (or maybe partial because) they have very strict entry criteria. TIL tends to show results quickly too and the responses are very durable.

    BTW, TIL for melanoma seems to be a variation of an approved treatment that’s been around sometime now for several blood cancers. A friend of mine’s best friend just underwent such a treatment where they grew his TILs in the lab, shut him up in the ICU, killed off his immune system with chemo (to keep his immune system from shutting down the new TIL cells), and then stuffed the stuff back into him. That was 3 months ago. He’s back now and doing well but still recovering (he’s still a whipped puppy actually. He lost a lot of weight over the last 6 months). He said it was a nightmare experience, one he never wants to have to repeat but he’s glad he did it as he didn’t have any choice really.

    Jeff

    #56802
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    There just aren’t enough numbers yet to show TIL as being most promising. Only small numbers have gone through this therapy. I hope we will learn more soon. Also, the idea of replacing IL2 with PD1 is intriguing.

    #56803
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Catherine Poole wrote:

    There just aren’t enough numbers yet to show TIL as being most promising. Only small numbers have gone through this therapy. I hope we will learn more soon. Also, the idea of replacing IL2 with PD1 is intriguing.

    Or combining them. ;-)

    Jeff

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