Home Forums Melanoma Diagnosis: Stages I &II Healthy habits

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #21288
    Jdk27
    Participant

    Hi everyone, just wondering what some good habits would be as far as eating. I am active, walk everyday, was working out with light weights until 3 months ago with the first of 3 melanomas, and the 2 pre Mel’s. is sugar bad for cancer? Any hints on how to eat properly? Still recovering from the last melanoma surgery last Friday, so will not be able to run or work out yet….have to tell you, going a little stir crazy with all my time doing not much of anything, last one was on back with a 4 inch incission so can’t even CLEAN!…thank you.

    #60823
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Please look back at our conversations about diet and keeping the immune system healthy. One of the few vitamin supplements proved worthy is vitamin D, usually 1000 units is prescribed or more. Ask your doctor for a recommendation as you don’t want to take too much of it. Exercise is important once you are able again to do so. About diet, the Mediterranean diet is said to be healthiest, nuts, fruits, olive oil, fish, chicken, avoid red meats. Vegetarians live longer! There is no evidence that sugar is harmful. I believe in organic, locally grown as the healthiest food. And then for your mind, meditation, yoga, stretching etc. massage is all great to clear the brain.

    #60824
    cohanja
    Participant

    why do so many people proclaim, “cancer loves sugar” ?

    #60825
    Jdk27
    Participant

    Thank you , Catherine. I will look into your recommendations. As far as the question on sugar’ my sister had stage three breast cancer, a rare form of it and in both breast. It is has been five years now and she is doing well…..she told me a couple of years ago about sugar being our enemy as far as feeding cancer. That is what she was told, not sure where she is on the subject today but will certainly do what is best for me what ever that may be…lol, still trying to figure it out.

    I know someone else has said this, maybe plenty of others as well, but I have to say it, too. I feel like I can’t talk to anyone about this experience i am going through, except for this forum. They don’t understand how I am feeling. They are kind, and try to be understanding, but it seems like since the cuts have been made, it is all over with and no one needs to talk about it. I’m not done, I have lots of thoughts, concerns, and most important, questions.

    Thank all for this forum and support .

    #60826
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster
    #60827
    cohanja
    Participant

    What about meat, is that myth or reality?

    #60828
    wpatterson4
    Participant

    Quote:

    I know someone else has said this, maybe plenty of others as well, but I have to say it, too. I feel like I can’t talk to anyone about this experience i am going through, except for this forum. They don’t understand how I am feeling. They are kind, and try to be understanding, but it seems like since the cuts have been made, it is all over with and no one needs to talk about it. I’m not done, I have lots of thoughts, concerns, and most important, questions.

    You’re not alone in this boat, my friend. I can’t speak for everyone else, but this is a huge problem for me, too. You feel as if you’re left to deal with it by yourself. You need the support of family and friends because you fear the future, but they treat you as if you’re a teenager who suffered a breakup. They just don’t want to hear about it.

    #60829
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    So right you are W. Patterson(do you have a nickname?) My family was totally unconcerned despite the major surger and skin graft I needed during my pregnancy. “you’ll be fine’ they said. So we must find that special friend or online buddy to support us.

    Cohanja (do you have a nickname?) I discussed meat in my prior post here. Vegetarians live longest, there’s an interesting story on Seventh Day Adventists a small religious group and how healthy they are from not eating meat: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CDEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.forbes.com%2F2009%2F04%2F06%2Fcentenarians-exercise-diet-personal-finance-retirement-live-to-100.html&ei=h_ScUcT1Nc_64AOVhYH4Ag&usg=AFQjCNHV-Jjm4cYMS4AcH9e8_VEpCgMc7g&sig2=7_DylcqoRs6pWDsdNiBa9w&bvm=bv.46751780,d.dmg

    #60830
    cohanja
    Participant

    But isn’t that what we tell people here. . “you’ll be fine” ?

    #60831
    Melanie1128
    Participant

    Don’t we all want to be told, “You’ll be fine?”. I was agonizing to a friend of mine the other day saying, “I have 86 percent survival rate. Why isn’t it 100 percent?”. He simply hugged me and said, “You’re in the 86 percent.” Maybe I am, maybe I’m not. But by God, I heard his faith and it made me feel fantastic. :)

    #60832
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Yes, we tell people that, but only if we mean it. I always couch it with words like promising and hopeful. My family didn’t come to visit me or help me chase my 3 year old on crutches and pregnant and scared to boot. I needed more than a phone call that said you will be fine and let’s not discuss it further.

    #60833
    Jdk27
    Participant

    Thank you all, for your supportive and encouraging words..I feel better today, we went to moffitt today for my 5 day post op. although they didn’t have my path reports as of yet, the Doctor Did answer my questions, and as long as I keep my appts with the derm, and they catch them when they are still thin, ( he did say i Will probably have more melanomas and most likely other skin cancers) then things look good. I am very sure the three biopsies he did last Friday along with my wide excision, will come back fine.

    #60834
    wpatterson4
    Participant

    Catherine,

    I’ve never had a nickname that stuck. Most of the people who don’t like saying “William” just call me by my last name.

    #60835
    wpatterson4
    Participant

    Melanie,

    I think it’s different for everyone. A lot of people can put the possibility of a bad outcome out of their minds, and, in those cases, reassurance of a good outcome is probably best. The rest of us have a harder time dealing with it. We feel that it’s not too much to ask that a few of our closest family members and friends at least listen to us for five minutes every now and then. When they simply tell you “everything’s going to be fine,” you get the impression that they either don’t take it seriously or that they want to avoid thinking about it because it’s unpleasant.

    #60836
    Lisa_hoffman
    Participant

    Hello everyone. I’m totally new to this forum, so bear with me… I was diagnosed with melanoma 2 years ago at age 25. I had just gotten married a month prior, and the diagnosis shook me a bit. Last month I had a routine derm check up with a biopsy (like always) and this one came back abnormal. Pathology couldn’t agree, one says melanoma, another says just severely abnormal. Which led to surgery and the whole 9… And bless my husbands heart, he tries to understand where I’m coming from but he just doesn’t because he hasn’t gone through it. (Which I’m thankful for) but reading your posts–it’s like, FINALLY someone who gets it. I try to talk to friends and it just makes them uncomfortable. So I keep it to myself all the time. Most days I’m okay but sometimes I’m terrified and people don’t understand that. Or they tell me “but they removed it so you’re fine.” And it is so much more than just walking out of your surgery and leaving it all in that room… It takes an emotional toll. I just feel so relieved to see these posts, and I am not the only one.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
  • The forum ‘Melanoma Diagnosis: Stages I &II’ is closed to new topics and replies.