Home Forums Melanoma Diagnosis: Stages I &II new mass in breast

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  • #61584
    tbeau
    Participant

    Thank you Webbie, Catherine and Rojam. My surgeon is a breast specialist. I did have a marker inserted during the biopsy. I don’t think it was a pink ribbon though. :) Just a piece of titanium, but they still said they need to do the wire procedure. I did get a second opinion today and I am going forward with the surgery. I do not want to have it closely monitored with mammograms every three months and deal with the anxiety that surrounds that and other biopsies. I guess I just want it out. Thanks to all who have helped me through this. Catherine you are an absolute treasure to all who visit here.

    #61585
    tbeau
    Participant

    Hello everyone. I had the lumpectomy and recovered with no pain. The placement of the wire and having to wait to be operated on for several hours was the worst part. The biopsy came back with atypical cells in the milk duct and the “recommendation” is to go on tamoxifen (sorry for the spelling) for 5 years. My question is whether anyone knows whether taking this drug would preclude me from any clinical trials in the event my melanoma spreads in the future. The tamoxifen would cut the increased risk by close to 50% but only results in a 2% decrease as the increased risk that I would develop breast cancer is just over 4%. Thank you in advance for any input.

    #61586
    Webbie73
    Participant

    tbeau wrote:

    Hello everyone. I had the lumpectomy and recovered with no pain. The placement of the wire and having to wait to be operated on for several hours was the worst part. The biopsy came back with atypical cells in the milk duct and the “recommendation” is to go on tamoxifen (sorry for the spelling) for 5 years. My question is whether anyone knows whether taking this drug would preclude me from any clinical trials in the event my melanoma spreads in the future. The tamoxifen would cut the increased risk by close to 50% but only results in a 2% decrease as the increased risk that I would develop breast cancer is just over 4%. Thank you in advance for any input.

    I don’t know about precluding you from clinical trials. My procedure was prior to my melanoma so any decisions I made did not involve the thoughts of a future clinical trial. I did not take Tamoxifen even though that would have been the recommendation. I am at a higher risk for stroke so no tamoxifen. It is now close to 7 years later and knock on wood all my mammograms have come back A-OK. BTW I had this scare twice in the past which were 3 years apart so the 7 years makes me happy!

    Do your reading on Tamoxifen and all the possible side effects. In hindsight I am glad I did not take the tamoxifen.

    #61587
    tbeau
    Participant

    Thank you Webbie for your reply. I just learned that I qualify for the genetic blood test and I will be getting that. I appreciate your reply as I am not that jazzed about taking Tamoxifen and its great to hear that you decided against it and are doing A-OK 7 years later. I have not decided against the Tamoxifen yet but I will be waiting to get the results of the genetic blood test before I make any decisions. Take care. And thank you.

    #61588
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    I know you mentioned you were seeing a breast specialist, but I would get another opinion. Having a few cells in the ductal area may not be indicative of this therapy. Where do you live? We can help you with finding another opinion. Things have changed in breast cancer treatment and from recent review of an article (my sister had ductal) there is a tendency to over treat this very lower risk concern. Happy to help you find an additional opinion. Also, are they testing you for BRCA gene? Do you have a family history?

    Here is an article I read this summer which made me think my sister was over-treated:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/magazine/our-feel-good-war-on-breast-cancer.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    #61589
    cohanja
    Participant

    Wonder if some of this might also apply to melanoma?

    Breast cancer in your breast doesn’t kill you; the disease becomes deadly when it metastasizes, spreading to other organs or the bones. Early detection is based on the theory, dating back to the late 19th century, that the disease progresses consistently, beginning with a single rogue cell, growing sequentially and at some invariable point making a lethal leap. Curing it, then, was assumed to be a matter of finding and cutting out a tumor before that metastasis happens.

    The thing is, there was no evidence that the size of a tumor necessarily predicted whether it had spread.

    As improbable as it sounds, studies have suggested that about a quarter of screening-detected cancers might have gone away on their own.

    #61590
    CathySoCal
    Participant

    I receive feeds from the Cancer Network (“home of the Journal of Oncology”). This timely article popped into my mail box yesterday. Hope it sheds some light, and doesn’t muddy the waters too much.

    http://www.cancernetwork.com/breast-cancer/content/article/10165/2152568

    I’m sure Catherine will know whether this study is a good one.

    Stay cool this weekend everyone…

    #61591
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    That is a very interesting article, thanks for sharing!

    #61592
    tbeau
    Participant

    Thank you all for the replies and the articles. I am trying to get up to speed on ADH and tamoxifen, much the same way I had to get up to speed on melanoma. I am scheduled for the BRCA blood test in September. I guess it takes 4 weeks to get the results of the blood test. I do have family history including my sister and great grandmother. I have more cancer in my family than I knew of until I had to inquire. I have decided not to do anything until after the results of the BRCA test. I do hope to get a second opinion. I think it would be best to wait for the results of the genetic test before I get the second opinion. I live outside of Albany, NY and can travel to either Dana Farber in Boston or Sloan Memorial in NYC. My ob/gyn said he can set up the appointment for me.

    Thank you for your on going support.

    #61593
    Worrywart
    Participant

    I will be thinking of you and hoping for negative results on blood test. As if melanoma wasn’t enough to deal with! I don’t know that much about breast cancer, although I have 3 friends who are survivors (two in their 30s and one in her 40s).

    #61594
    Tico1
    Participant

    Hi-I hope all is well for you, and this has turned out to be nothing. I hate to hijack the post but Abby I am curious about the study. My niece was just diagnosed with melanoma and lost her mom to breast cancer in 2010. Her mom had BRCA1. My niece has not been tested yet. I tried to private message but I can’t yet!

    #61595
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    All family members should be tested for the brca gene if the mom had it. It affects boys/men with prostate and colon cancer. Long ago they thought only women carried it. Also, it can cause ovarian cancer in women. So a good test for all is a good thing. You can be preemptive then with the other cancer possibilities.

    #61596
    tbeau
    Participant

    Hello. I just wanted to provide a quick update. I received the results of the BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 test and I do not have the gene mutation. Thankfully!! I have also decided against taking tamoxifen right now as it only decreases my risk in developing breast cancer by 2%. I was just too uncomfortable with the potential side effects. Thank you to everyone for your support and information. :)

Viewing 13 posts - 16 through 28 (of 28 total)
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