Home Forums Melanoma Diagnosis: Stages I &II Pregnancy and Vitamin C supplements

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  • #22052
    buttercup1
    Participant

    I was diagnosed with stage 2B Melanoma 4 years ago at the age of 34 – had a SNB and thankfully there was no sign of it in my Lymph Nodes . (I live in the UK so I have been visiting my Consultant every 3 months for 3 years and it then increases to 6 months for the last 2 years so I have had 14 check ups put of a total of 16 – You can tell I am counting each one as they go by). I struggled with extreme anxiety and was refereed to a Consultant Psychologist for 2 and half years after diagnosis and she confirmed I was showing signs of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder due to the levels of anxiety I was suffering from e.g fear of reoccurrence, being afraid of the sun – without her I don’t know how I would have got through the last 4 years. I decided to wait until my three year appointment before trying for a baby due to my fears of reading horror stories about Melanoma returning and passing onto the unborn baby. Two months later I was pregnant but miscarried at 7 weeks. Ever since the miscarriage, I am terrified of trying again as I am focussing on the possibility of reoccurrence and it is ruining the happiness I have with my Partner. As we are all aware, no-one can tell me that it will never come back – which stupidly I crave for.

    My GP mentioned about the levels of Vitamin C being important if I was to try again for another baby due to the Melanoma but as I was in an upset state at the time, the thought of trying for another baby seemed a long way away- has anybody else taken Vitamin C or know why it is important when either trying for a baby?

    #64769
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Never heard vitamin C did anything really, but it is good to get it fresh from the source, i.e. broccoli, citrus, etc. It can be toxic in high doses, though. But not evidence I know of for fertility. Miscarriage often happens because of an issue with the baby, and I’m so sorry for your loss.

    #64770
    farang100
    Participant

    buttercup1 wrote:

    I was diagnosed with stage 2B Melanoma 4 years ago at the age of 34 – had a SNB and thankfully there was no sign of it in my Lymph Nodes . (I live in the UK so I have been visiting my Consultant every 3 months for 3 years and it then increases to 6 months for the last 2 years so I have had 14 check ups put of a total of 16 – You can tell I am counting each one as they go by). I struggled with extreme anxiety and was refereed to a Consultant Psychologist for 2 and half years after diagnosis and she confirmed I was showing signs of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder due to the levels of anxiety I was suffering from e.g fear of reoccurrence, being afraid of the sun – without her I don’t know how I would have got through the last 4 years. I decided to wait until my three year appointment before trying for a baby due to my fears of reading horror stories about Melanoma returning and passing onto the unborn baby. Two months later I was pregnant but miscarried at 7 weeks. Ever since the miscarriage, I am terrified of trying again as I am focussing on the possibility of reoccurrence and it is ruining the happiness I have with my Partner. As we are all aware, no-one can tell me that it will never come back – which stupidly I crave for.

    My GP mentioned about the levels of Vitamin C being important if I was to try again for another baby due to the Melanoma but as I was in an upset state at the time, the thought of trying for another baby seemed a long way away- has anybody else taken Vitamin C or know why it is important when either trying for a baby?

    I don’t know about pregnancy but it is used by many people as an adjunct to mainstream cancer treatments. Perfectly safe even in very high doses for most people and non toxic and there is some evidence that it may slow down tumour growth or even help in preventing recurrence. I do vitamin C infusions myself a couple of times a week.

    Being pregnant you need to check whether this is an issue or not and you will also need to test if you have a kidney issue .

    #64771
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Sorry, I have not seen any scientific evidence that Vitamin C has any curative powers. I would not suggest a pregnant woman embark on high doses of any vitamin, including vitamin C. Linus Pauling spent years trying to prove Vitamin C has special attributes, but ultimately failed. Please show the scientific findings before suggesting such a regimen.

    #64772
    farang100
    Participant

    Catherine Poole wrote:

    Sorry, I have not seen any scientific evidence that Vitamin C has any curative powers. I would not suggest a pregnant woman embark on high doses of any vitamin, including vitamin C. Linus Pauling spent years trying to prove Vitamin C has special attributes, but ultimately failed. Please show the scientific findings before suggesting such a regimen.

    Take a look at this link.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/highdosevitaminc/patient/page2

    I did say may in my original post and if pregnant of course you would need to be very careful nonetheless it is used quite often as a complimentary treatment for cancer even by mainstream practitioners.

    #64773
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Please read the information that pertains to human studies and note no mention of tumor reduction:

    Have any clinical trials (research studies with people) of high-dose vitamin C been conducted?

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia, refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, or metastatic melanoma treated with vitamin C combined with other drugs had serious side effects and the disease got worse.

    7.Have any side effects or risks been reported from high-dose vitamin C?

    Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials. However, high-dose vitamin C may be harmful in patients with certain risk factors.

    •In patients with a history of kidney disorders, kidney failure has been reported after ascorbic acid treatment. Patients with a tendency to develop kidney stones should not be treated with high-dose vitamin C.

    •Case reports have shown that patients with an inherited disorder called G-6-PD deficiency should not be given high doses of vitamin C, due to the risk of hemolysis (a condition in which red blood cells are destroyed).

    •Since vitamin C may make iron more easily absorbed and used by the body, high doses of the vitamin are not recommended for patients with hemochromatosis (a condition in which the body takes up and stores more iron than it needs).

    8.Have any drug interactions been reported from combining high-dose vitamin C with anticancer drugs?

    A drug interaction is a change in the way a drug acts in the body when taken with certain other drugs. High-dose vitamin C, when combined with some anticancer drugs, may cause them to be less effective. So far, these effects have been seen only in some laboratory and animal studies. No clinical trials have been done to further research these drug interactions in humans.

    •Combining vitamin C with an anticancer drug called bortezomib has been studied in cell cultures and in animal models. Bortezomib is a targeted therapy that blocks several molecular pathways in a cell, causing cancer cells to die. Several studies showed that vitamin C made bortezomib less effective, including in multiple myeloma cells. A study in mice transplanted with human prostate cancer cells, however, did not show that giving the mice different doses of vitamin C by mouth made bortezomib therapy less effective.

    •An oxidized form of vitamin C called dehydroascorbic acid has been studied in cell cultures and in animals with tumors. Several studies have found that high doses of dehydroascorbic acid can interfere with the anticancer effects of several chemotherapy drugs. Dehydroascorbic acid is found in only small amounts in dietary supplements and in fresh foods.

    See Question 5 and Question 6 for more information on combining vitamin C with anticancer drugs.

    9.Is high-dose vitamin C approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as a cancer treatment in the United States?

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition.

    Because dietary supplements are regulated as foods, not as drugs, FDA approval is not required unless specific claims about disease prevention or treatment are made.

    #64774
    farang100
    Participant

    Catherine Poole wrote:

    Please read the information that pertains to human studies and note no mention of tumor reduction:

    Have any clinical trials (research studies with people) of high-dose vitamin C been conducted?

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia, refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, or metastatic melanoma treated with vitamin C combined with other drugs had serious side effects and the disease got worse.

    7.Have any side effects or risks been reported from high-dose vitamin C?

    Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials. However, high-dose vitamin C may be harmful in patients with certain risk factors.

    •In patients with a history of kidney disorders, kidney failure has been reported after ascorbic acid treatment. Patients with a tendency to develop kidney stones should not be treated with high-dose vitamin C.

    •Case reports have shown that patients with an inherited disorder called G-6-PD deficiency should not be given high doses of vitamin C, due to the risk of hemolysis (a condition in which red blood cells are destroyed).

    •Since vitamin C may make iron more easily absorbed and used by the body, high doses of the vitamin are not recommended for patients with hemochromatosis (a condition in which the body takes up and stores more iron than it needs).

    8.Have any drug interactions been reported from combining high-dose vitamin C with anticancer drugs?

    A drug interaction is a change in the way a drug acts in the body when taken with certain other drugs. High-dose vitamin C, when combined with some anticancer drugs, may cause them to be less effective. So far, these effects have been seen only in some laboratory and animal studies. No clinical trials have been done to further research these drug interactions in humans.

    •Combining vitamin C with an anticancer drug called bortezomib has been studied in cell cultures and in animal models. Bortezomib is a targeted therapy that blocks several molecular pathways in a cell, causing cancer cells to die. Several studies showed that vitamin C made bortezomib less effective, including in multiple myeloma cells. A study in mice transplanted with human prostate cancer cells, however, did not show that giving the mice different doses of vitamin C by mouth made bortezomib therapy less effective.

    •An oxidized form of vitamin C called dehydroascorbic acid has been studied in cell cultures and in animals with tumors. Several studies have found that high doses of dehydroascorbic acid can interfere with the anticancer effects of several chemotherapy drugs. Dehydroascorbic acid is found in only small amounts in dietary supplements and in fresh foods.

    See Question 5 and Question 6 for more information on combining vitamin C with anticancer drugs.

    9.Is high-dose vitamin C approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as a cancer treatment in the United States?

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition.

    Because dietary supplements are regulated as foods, not as drugs, FDA approval is not required unless specific claims about disease prevention or treatment are made.

    There are animal studies done that indicate significant tumour reduction using high dosage intravenous vitamin c.

    http://www.nih.gov/news/health/aug2008/niddk-04.htm

    Unfortunately not much research has been done on humans using high dosage intravenous vitamin c.

    Much of the research was done on oral doses which was not effective.

    Combining vitamin C with other drug therapies needs to be monitored carefully as of course interactions may prove harmful as with any supplement or drug for that matter.

    Ditto to the other points raised re possible complications with vitamin C.

    Whilst Vit C may not be a magic bullet overall thou after screening is done and possible drug interactions are taken into account vitamin C shows plenty of promise with very few side effects and possibly plenty of benefits as an adjunct or complimentary treatment.

    #64775
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    Animal studies rarely equate to human studies and aren’t randomized. We are under the HonCode here to provide information that is backed by substantial scientific data. There are many “natural” substances making claims and just as many folks selling them. Show me a study with 800 people randomized study and I will feel it is a genuine product to be given. There are lots of clinics charging a lot of money for IV vitamin C and it shouldn’t be. The FDA has not approved this either as a therapy.

    #64776
    farang100
    Participant

    Catherine Poole wrote:

    Animal studies rarely equate to human studies and aren’t randomized. We are under the HonCode here to provide information that is backed by substantial scientific data. There are many “natural” substances making claims and just as many folks selling them. Show me a study with 800 people randomized study and I will feel it is a genuine product to be given. There are lots of clinics charging a lot of money for IV vitamin C and it shouldn’t be. The FDA has not approved this either as a therapy.

    The problem is that many complimentary therapies that may be beneficial for cancer patients will never get extensive research done on them because of the high cost of said research with no chance or any payday for the companies at the end because they cant patent it.

    I agree with you on clinics charging high charges for vit C therapy. A complete rip off. Having said that mainstream treatments are very expensive as well. The whole health care sector is out of control in its costing and pricing.

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