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  • #57007
    krissy424
    Participant

    Catherine posted

    Quote:

    Working with stage IV patients daily I have to say they are truly thankful for every moment their life has been extended.

    Absolutely i would want to extend my life by any medical treatment available.I have followed the history of Stage 4 survivors on other forums. If one doesn’t live near a city, thousands of dollars are spent by many flying to Trials.

    Bottom line, the only medical treatment available to the uninsured with no cash resources is urgent treatment in the ER to stabilize and refer out. That is of little help for a chronic condition like melanoma. I see more Stage 4 people in long term remission all the time, and that’s wonderful.

    #57008
    toastwave
    Participant

    Here, here!

    When I was getting the second opinion on my original borderline mole, I was on a managed health plan through my partner’s job that mandated a certain derm. office and had extraordinary costs associated with outside referrals. Well, extraordinary at least for our young family. And, I hated that derm. I actually went back to work sooner than I’d planned after having our daughter because I needed better health insurance as a result of my diagnosis. Not only that, I chose my job in great part because the network for the insurance carrier in that organization included in-network docs. at the top melanoma clinic where I live. Now, I have over 10 years of higher education under my belt and 7 years working in my field and THE deciding factor for me in seeking and accepting a job was the insurance benefits available to me. Ten years ago, when I started my career, I thought I would be looking for work based on my skills and interests. Or, maybe based on pay. My job is definitely related to what I want to be doing but I get paid significantly less than the market average because I work for a state org. And, in considering moving, changing jobs, having a second kid, etc…probably one of the top things on my family’s mind is what my health insurance situation would be and whether we can afford the deductibles, co-pays, family limits, etc, if my insurance situation changed. Because, though I am considered very low risk with a think borderline lesion, I have already had 5 biopsies and one re-excision since my original lesion. And, even with this great insurance plan and access to a great medical team, we’ve probably paid out over $2500 in 1.5 years since my diagnosis not counting the monthly insurance deduction on my paycheck. The point is:

    1) I cannot imagine the horrendous insurance hell that those with more advanced stages have to undergo and

    2) It is absolutely not true that those with decent health plans do not care about the broken heath care system.

    At least for us, we view it as categorically unfair that someone should even have to think that their only option would be to die because they see absolutely no way to access care and would gladly downsize our lives, pay more taxes, and have a safety net for everyone. Furthermore, the currently insured are only a small family emergency or catastrophe away from becoming uninsured and screwed in this country unless they are super rich. So, really, it may seem like a huge valley separates us but it’s a pretty quick jaunt across if things go wrong. In our case, for example, my job is grant-funded so there are no guarantees.

    Anyway, my 5 cents.

    #57009
    krissy424
    Participant

    Toastwave posted :

    Quote:

    At least for us, we view it as categorically unfair that someone should even have to think that their only option would be to die because they see absolutely no way to access care and would gladly downsize our lives, pay more taxes, and have a safety net for everyone. Furthermore, the currently insured are only a small family emergency or catastrophe away from becoming uninsured and screwed in this country unless they are super rich. So, really, it may seem like a huge valley separates us but it’s a pretty quick jaunt across if things go wrong. In our case, for example, my job is grant-funded so there are no guarantees.

    Someone who actually understands. Your words touched me and are much appreciated.

    I’m the grandmother of three, soon to be five and I’m very active in their lives. I have lots to do.

    Kris

    #57010
    cohanja
    Participant

    “my job is grant-funded so there are no guarantees” Heck, any job, grant funded or not, is not guaranteed. I work in corporate America – not grant-funded, but certainly no guarantees about my job!

    #57011
    Catherine Poole
    Keymaster

    My job is grant funded and depends on generous contributors among you. No, there are no guarantees in life about many things, but healthcare should be something that all can count on being there whether they have money or not.

    #57012
    cohanja
    Participant

    And even if you have insurance your out of pocket can still be thousands each year – that has been my experience anyway.

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 36 total)
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